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Simple Fasciectomy

When would I have a simple fasciectomy?

If the Dupuytren's Contracture is painful or if there is a restriction of mobility (inability to rest the hand flat on the table is considered as a reasonable indicator for deciding to have surgery) or an inability to use the hand normally due to the contracture are indications for surgery.

If the skin overlying the nodules and cords is not affected a procedure known as a simple fasciectomy suffices.

What problems can arise following a simple fasciectomy?

Just like any other operation, a simple fasciectomy for Dupuytren’s contracture can have post operative problems such as bleeding, haematoma formation, infection or delayed healing of the wound. 

The sensation at the tips of the fingers can change, the scars can be tight and in time patients can develop a recurrence at the site of surgery or new disease may develop in other parts of the hand which is unrelated to the part that has been operated upon.

What is the normal post operative course following a simple fasciectomy?

Most patients will have fine stitches placed in the skin and the hand is placed in a plaster splint.  The splint is removed in the week following surgery by the Hand Therapist who then prepare a plastic splint to keep the fingers and thumb stretched.  This plastic splint is normally worn at night after the first two weeks and the hand is free during the day to exercise and to use for day to day activities.  The plastic splint is normally for a period of six months following surgery.

Back to Dupuytren's contracture

My breasts settled very quickly and I was extremely happy with the results. They ended up being almost exactly the size I wanted. I went back to see Mr. Sood three months later and he confirmed everything was fine and going how he wanted.

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Fasciectomy palm and little finger


Palmar fasciectomy

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